Light At The End Of The Tunnel

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I come from a long line of head strong, persistent, unbending, determined, unshakable and even sometimes stubborn,  vain and obstinate women.  These traits are as cultivated and propagated in Southern women as energetically as our “famous” manners.  We grow up being taught that saying pretty please, thank you and I’ll pray for you is of the same importance as lip gloss and mascara.

We are coached early in our little lives how and when we pray for the neighbors, when saying bless their hearts is appropriate (nicely or not so nicely), you don’t leave the house without makeup and most importantly when and where to wear waterproof mascara. There isn’t southern woman alive that doesn’t have the “special” tube of mascara for funerals and maybe a wedding.  You can bet your bottom dollar if you see a Southern woman crying that wasn’t prepared with waterproof mascara someone has messed up really bad and there will be HELL to pay.  I would suggest to run…..

Southern women are reared knowing there are only a few acceptable reasons to show weakness and cry and even then you best not be sobbing in public.  That’s reserved solely for those closest to you who can’t run away.  This is typically our poor husbands who is completely screwed regardless of what direction he chooses. This poor testosterone filled man who typically is married to the Rock of Gibraltar now finds himself in an non win situation.   He really has no good options.  If he tries to fix it he is condescending and if he comforts he is babying (and you DON’T baby tenacious) The smart ones just quietly help around the house, hug us tight and send us to the friends for a good cry until it’s out of system.

We need a good cry as much as the next girl – we just DON’T like it!!  Somehow we think it’s disrespectful to all those strong women who we come from to fall apart.  It’s like we’re disappointing them or we will make them roll over in their graves.  The most scary option is they’ll come haunt me.  I can’t have that – if my granny came visiting and saw how messy my house is she wouldn’t just role over in her grave she would do somersaults and never leave.  I already hear my momma in my head all day- I really don’t know if I could take her too…….

So after telling you all this –  you can imagine my surprise the other day as I was driving alone to pick up a parasite (children for those nicer than me) when I found black mascara tears rolling down my cheeks.  I have always prided myself on being a “tough ole broad”  I don’t cry often and hate it sincerely. If I cry it’s usually a built up explode. Either my feeling are really hurt or I’m mad and trying NOT to kill you, but this was different.

These tears didn’t come from anger or my feelings being hurt, they came from a different place.  My first thought was “damn menopause hormones”, but the honest truth is I think they came from a different place. These tears were coming from the sadness of the “light at the end of the tunnel”

I remember when I had three parasites, all in diapers, and I would speak to people who had teenagers and be jealous. I felt like my life was crazy and I saw no end in site. It was a constant life of “diapers, dinners, momma and honey”  I remember saying “you have light at then end of tunnel and I’m not so sure I’ll survive til I get there”  I never understood their looks of longing at my jealously.

As I sit here today with that light getting so bright in my eyes I need sunglasses I understand.  I look up at all my parasites (they’re all taller than me now) and realize I have so little time with them left. I keep thinking it went too fast! Did I do a good enough job? Will they be a good citizen? Will they be good to their fellow humans? Will they be good parents some day? Did they hear me and will they pass on at least a little of what I taught them?

What I realized is the tears came from the realization that my “job” as a parent is almost over. It’s the understanding that this is the most significant job and role I’ll ever play and the only one that may have an impact in 100 years.  The tears were rolling down my cheeks because they’re typical teenagers and sometimes I’m so proud my chest may bust and sometimes I’m so scared I can’t breathe.  (if you haven’t ever had the experience of teaching a teenager to drive or gotten the call “mom I had a wreck” yet- my advice is your best bet is to keep them in diapers)

The tears were rolling because I’m at the point where I can only maneuver the people I’ve helped develop – good or bad.  The heavy lifting of right and wrong and good and evil are past.  Their basic emotional and ethic makeup is set.  Now I can only pray they heard and choose to live the lessons I tried to teach.

The black mascara tears rolling down my cheeks, which were against every thing I had ever been taught, came from that blinding light or maybe it was only the menopausal hormones . Yep- I think my southern stubborn and unshakable self is going with menopause so the parasites don’t have hell to pay or need to run away any faster than they already are……………..: 😦

 

One thought on “Light At The End Of The Tunnel

    usernamemommy said:
    June 13, 2016 at 2:38 am

    Really liking this post… Hopefully our generation has raised our own daughters so that they are more comfortable with their own emotions than how we were raised- why were we so encouraged to hold those emotions in like that anyway?? I am so with you on hoping and praying that I did enough for, taught them enough, made the right kind of impact on my children. My oldest are young adults now and so far, so good! It is a glorious day the first time you see or hear them do or say something that you know they picked up from you and incorporated into their adult lives. 🙂

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